Category Asian Culture & History

A History Of Money In Singapore

November 1, 2021 Asian Culture & History

by Clement Liew & Peter Wilson
ISBN 9789811821295
240 X 170 mm
Paperback; 440 pages
Pub Date: November 2021
BIC: HB

This is the story of the money used from pre-colonial times to the present day on the island we know as Singapore.

This signature book describes the multiplicity of currencies that have been used in and around the island over the centuries, and how these culminate in the Singapore dollar today. The authors trace the impact, sometimes dramatic, of political and economic events and technological path, from the days when, in the first few decades of the colonial settlement, local merchants resisted currency reforms imposed on the island by the East India Company. Greater monetary autonomy was achieved in the second half of the 19th century when Singapore became a Crown colony in its own right. The drive towards self-representation culminated in full internal self-government in 1959, independence from British colonial rule in 1963 as part of the Federation of Malaysia, and the status of a sovereign nation in 1965. The introduction of Singapore's own currency in 1967 was a national milestone. In 1971, Singapore established the Monetary Authority of Singapore with the sovereign power to undertake monetary policy as it deemed most appropriate.

Money has evolved from coins minted from precious metals to those struck from baser metals, to notes issued first by commercial banks and later by governments. The journey from commodity-based money to a purely flat money has unfolded in parallel. The use of money in its electronic and more 'weightless' forms has also become increasingly common. The powerful effects this trend will have on the nature of money and banking are still unfolding. All these issues, and more, are examined in this book, published to mark the 50th anniversary of the founding of Singapore's central bank, the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), in January 1971. 

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Singapore at Random: Magic, Myths & Milestones (New and Updated)

June 1, 2021 Asian Culture & HistoryAsian Writing

New & updated by Alvin Tan
ISBN 9789811476013
200 X 145 mm
Paperback; 160 pages
Pub Date: July 2021
BIC: AMX, AMC

An illustrated collection of Singapore truth and trivia, Singapore at Random is filled with anecdotes, statistics, quotes, diagrams, facts, advice, folklore and other unusual and often useful tidbits. This veritable treasure trove of information on Singapore is arranged, as the title suggests, randomly, so that readers will come to expect the unexpected on each and every page. Designed in a charmingly classic style and peppered with attractive illustrations, Singapore at Random is a quirky and irresistible celebration of everything you didn’t know you wanted to know about this unique and unmissable country. This new edition of Singapore at Random provides the answers to these and many other fun and fascinating questions about the city state.

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In Red Weather: Turmoil In Indonesia: A CIA Insider’s Account From The 1960s

March 7, 2021 Asian Culture & HistoryPolitics / Current Affairs

by Daniel F. Cameron
ISBN 9789814610544
215 X 150 mm
Hardback; 188 pages
Pub Date: March 2021
BIC: BM

In Red Weather is the true story of one of the major intelligence coups in modern history. Daniel F. Cameron, a young, idealistic American spy for CIA, lands in Surabaya in the 1960s, when the USSR, Communist China, and the US are vying for strategic influence in Indonesia. He soon teams up with Wim Vermeulen, a formidable maverick and former member of the WWII Dutch Resistance, who becomes the source of highly classified Soviet information. Their dangerous mission unfolds against a backdrop of seething turmoil, intrigue and betrayal that leads to the downfall of Sukarno and the bloody destruction of the six million-member Communist party. In Red Weather is the riveting espionage memoir of our time.

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Heroes, Gods and Guardians: Hilts and Keris of Indonesia: Huntington Miller Collection

February 7, 2021 Asian Culture & History

by Bruce W. Carpenter
ISBN 9789811482960
230 X 230 mm
Hardback; 160 pages
Pub Date: February 2021
BIC: JHMC

Put together over a period of twenty years, the Huntington Miller Collection of Keris and Keris Hilts is a tour de force. The emphasis here is on the sculptural aesthetic and historical importance of this unique art form from throughout Indonesia—Java, Sumatra, Borneo, Bali, Lombok, Sulawesi—and beyond. It is a story that spans centuries and the rise and fall of countless kingdoms and polities. The hilts range from minimalistic forms to the abstract to opulent royal weapons beautifully crafted to project prestige and wealth. So, too, they carry with them the aura of mystery and magic of the exotic tropical islands of Southeast Asia, which captured the imagination of foreigners even before the beginning of the Age of Spices, when the perilous journey from Europe to Indonesia took a year to complete. With a terse and informative text written by Indonesian art expert, Bruce W. Carpenter, this is a cultural and artistic voyage that delights the eye and stimulates the mind.

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Singapore A Very Short History: From Temasek To Tomorrow

October 21, 2019 ArchitectureAsian Culture & HistoryAsian Writing

By Alvin Tan
ISBN 9789811433481
198 X 129 mm
Paperback; 192 pages
Pub Date: November 2019
BIC: AMX, AMC

Singapore: A Very Short History — From Temasek to Tomorrow is a fresh, new, and highly-readable account of Singapore’s history. It is a sweeping story of discovery, abandonment, rediscovery and development of what is today one of the world’s greatest port-cities. Brief as this account may be, it incorporates all the latest research and findings about Singapore’s past, and weaves a concise yet coherent and comprehensive account of the island over the last 700 years.
Beyond familiar foundational myths and stories, this new account weaves Singapore’s story on a wide tapestry – through a cast of princes, sultans, colonial administrators, occupiers community leaders and politicians – and tells the tale of how they struggled to answer that allimportant question: How do we make this island succeed? Two recurrent themes emerge from this gripping account. First, that Singapore was an unlikely or accidental nation-state; and second, that given its vulnerability to wider regional and international forces, it survived and flourished only because it was able to constantly change and adapt to make itself useful and relevant to the world. And what of tomorrow? Will Singapore survive? This book is a hopeful response to these questions.

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